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The Essential Valentine’s Day Bedroom Guide To Improve Sleep

Monday, February 13, 2017 11:59:09 AM America/Los_Angeles

Valentine’s Day Guide To Improve Sleep

The Essential Valentine’s Day Bedroom Guide To Improve Sleep

 

Valentine’s Day is all about celebrating love and romance, but what if you and your partner are not compatible in bed: when it comes to catching some z’s. When it comes to a loving relationship, the bedroom can be sometimes a war zone. Even in a healthy relationship lack of sleep can cause friction and irritation to the best of a loving connection. Snoring, blanket tug a wars, stress, reading, and even different mattress comfort levels can create problems in the bedroom and complicate the quality of efficient sleep needed. Trouble falling asleep or waking up throughout the night can cause issues with your natural sleep wake cycle, brain activity, cognitive function, your mood, depression, balance, immunity, weight gain, and memory problem and of course this all affects you and your partner.

Follow This Easy Valentine’s Day Guide To Improve Your Sleep

Tip 1: Sleep In Separate Beds

“Most couples want nothing more than than to go to sleep” says Sex and Relationship PH.D. Tammy Nelson. In a Recent article in Women’s Health, one of the biggest mistakes couples make in the bedroom is that they have to connect.

The Futon Shop guide

Source: National Sleep Foundation

Learn About The Ultimate Healthy Mattress Guide For Your Sleep Position


Tip 2: Sleep Together On A Performance Mattress

Staff’s Pick For Best Couples
Certification
shop performance mattresses

Tip 3: Healthy Eating Before Bed

Do you know the old Proverbs, “The Way To A Man’s Heart Is Through His Stomach”? Food Plays a huge role in relationships whether it is in the beginning of a romance or celebrating 50 years of marriage. When it comes to dates and anniversaries, what's on the menu becomes an important part of any relationship and highlight of the event, creating memories and lasting bonds eating your favorite cuisines or even cooking together and and having fun in the kitchen making new recipes together. Food becomes a part of the relationship as it becomes part of a human revolution.

“Humans have a theory of food; that there are "evolutionary, cultural, and neurocognitive underpinnings" to what we eat, why, how, with whom, and when that are as much a part of our minds as, for example, the instinct for acquiring language.”

- The Ominovorous Mind

The Omnivorous Mind mentions the topic surrounding food as a trigger on our memories, our emotions, and the connection with pleasure. But what if the food you are eating directly causes relationships problems because of the lack of the quality of sleep. Here is a great source of healthy eating for you and your partner:

Healthy snack for healthy sleep

 

Stay Away from Complex Carb and replace with: Popcorn, Oatmeal, Whole Wheat Crackers w/ nut butter

Regulate Sleep/Wake Cycle With Melatonin Nutrients: A Handful of Almonds and Walnuts

Increase Amino Acid Tryptophan To Increase Serotonin: Cottage Cheese, Milk

Natural Melatonin: Raspberries, Kiwis, Bananas, Tart Cherries

Source: National Sleep Foundation


Tip 4: Sleep Naked

This might not help you sleep better if you sleep with your partner in bed for obvious reasons, but if you sleep in different beds then this could be extremely beneficial for a restful sleep.

Sleep Nude

Source: U.S. National Sleep Foundation

the benefit of sleep in the nude

Source: Men’s Fitness


Tip 5: Learn Couples Massage

Learning to massage your partner brings romance and intimacy. Staying in on date night, massaging each other brings passion, trust and positivity to your relationship. And You save money! There are also amazing health benefits to massage that helps improves your sleep:

According to mayoclinic.org, receiving a massage benefits your health including insomnia related to stress.

Tips On Couples Massage

• Oil- Pick A Scent Your Partner Likes

Options: Sweet Almond Oil, Apricot Kernel Oil, Jojoba Oil or Fractionated Coconut Oil

• Romantic Music

Options: Chris Spheeris Eros, Enigma, Armik

• Concentrate On Form


Comments | Posted in Holidays By Marilyn Diamond

Futon Frame Stains and Finishes

Thursday, February 9, 2017 4:05:58 PM America/Los_Angeles

Futon Frame Stains and Finishes

Futon Frame Stains and Finishes

 

What is a Wood Finish?

A finish is a liquid, paste, or gel that can be spread thinly onto wood. The two basic types of finishes differ in how they interact with the wood. One forms a coating or film on the wood, while the other penetrates into the wood. Film finishes, which cure hard and can be built up in layers, include varnish, shellac, lacquer, water and latex based semitransparent stains, and solid-color stains. Penetrating finishes are oil-based and don’t cure to a hard film. These include oil finishes, such as tung and linseed oil, and oil-based stains.

Wood finishes can include a number of components, but their main composition consists of a pigment (or dye), a solvent and a binder. To make sure the pigment particles stay on the wood, a small amount of binder is added to the mix. Binder is any sort of resin that will dry to a solid film and act like glue to hold the pigment onto the wood. Most stain binders are made of the same resins we use to make finishes. Pigments or dyes are used in wood stains to add color and hide flaws. They are mixed in with the solvent and binder (resin).

Resin is the natural or synthetic film-forming component of these finishes. (Resins are also called binders, especially when used in stains or paints, because they hold – or bind – the pigment to the wood surface.) Resins include acrylics, vinyls, alkyds, cellulosics, epoxies, polyurethanes, and oils. The type of resin determines the finish’s hardness, flexibility, and resistance to stains, solvents, and water.

Solvents and/or thinners are used to maintain the finish in liquid form. Solvents are needed to dissolve resins. Thinners are used to reduce viscosity (thickness) of the liquid. Some finishes contain both solvents and thinners. Solvent-based coatings typically use organic solvents such as alcohols, ketones, glycol ethers, petroleum distillates (mineral spirits, toluene, xylenes, and naphtha), and turpentine. The solvent in a waterborne coating is usually a glycol ether and water is used as a thinner.

In addition to the previous components, manufacturers of wood finish add additional components to add specific characteristics to the finish. These characteristics can affect the drying time of the finish, can prevent fungus and mildew growth or can act as thickeners. Synthetic resins derived from coal tar and petroleum have recently been used to replace the natural resins, and petroleum distillates have become more commonly used solvents. Although petroleum based distillates can provide more durable finishes, increased concern over the negative health impact of VOC’s has created a resurgence in the use of pure oils and shellacs containing natural ingredients as well as a move toward water based finishes.

Shellacs

In its pure form, shellac is a natural resin secreted by the lac insect, found mostly in India and Thailand. Shellac cures as its solvent, alcohol, evaporates. Although it creates a brilliant shine, shellac’s uses are limited because of its susceptibility to damage from liquids and heat. Shellac is useful for touch-ups because it bonds well to most other finishes. Shellac is also used as a sealer and under-coat with lacquer or varnish and polyurethane. It may not be compatible as a sealer under certain polyurethanes, though, because of the natural wax it contains.

Varnishes

Technically, all resin-and-solvent mixes are varnishes. Shellac is a spirit varnish—it uses distilled spirits (denatured alcohol) as a solvent, while spar varnish uses a drying-type vegetable oil (typically tung oil) combined with phenolic resin. In today’s common usage, “varnish” means a mix of drying oil and a natural or artificial resin that is cooked (often with an inert-metal catalyst) to make a clear finish that is typically used indoors. Varnish, which cures by chemical reaction (polymerization), is known for good resistance to heat, solvents, and water. Alkyd and polyurethane varnishes, however, may contain high VOCs. Water-based varnishes using polyurethane or acrylic polymers have been developed that emit lower VOCs.

Lacquers

Lacquer is a clear finish best suited for accenting wood grain. It dries fast and is very durable. The most common type, nitrocellulose lacquer, uses a binder made from a natural polymer, cellulose, which is derived from wood or cotton. Lacquer thinner is a blend of solvents, which may include ketones and esters, alcohols, and fast-evaporating hydrocarbons such as toluene or xylene. Like shellac, lacquer cures by evaporation. Without a clear protective coating, it is easily scratched and susceptible to water damage. Another drawback to lacquer is its typically high solvent content.

Natural oils

Linseed oil and tung oil are penetrating finishes that cure by absorbing oxygen from the air, a process that strengthens the finish. Linseed oil is extracted from flax seeds. Boiled linseed oil used in wood finishing has been mixed with chemical additives to hasten the drying time. Tung oil is derived from the nuts of trees that are native to Asia. These oils are durable, water-resistant, and easy to apply but require several coats and are slow-drying. Natural oils that have been heat-treated to increase gloss and hardness and reduce curing time are called polymerized oils.

Water-based

Water-based finishes are actually made up of droplets of solvent-based finish, usually acrylic or polyurethane, and a solvent, usually a glycol ether, with water functioning as a thinner. Water-based finishes cure by coalescing: the droplets of finish move closer together and interlock as the water evaporates. Water-based finishes offer minimal solvent fumes, easy cleanup, and good scuff resistance, but they may raise the wood grain and offer only moderate resistance to water, heat, and solvents. Wood Stains. A wood stain is a finish for wood that contains a dye or pigment. Stains typically impart a semi-transparent or opaque coating and are designed to change the color of a surface without concealing the grain pattern or surface texture. More and more homeowners, builders, and architects are turning to penetrating stains instead of paints, especially for exterior use. Unlike paints, which form a film on the surface, these stains soak into the wood, accenting the wood grain rather than hiding it. Stains become part of the wood, which helps to prevent the cracking, peeling, chipping, or blistering that commonly occurs with paints.

Exterior stains

Exterior stains are used primarily on wood siding, shingles, decks and outdoor structures, and furniture. They are available in latex- and oil-based formulas. Oil-based semi-transparent stains offer the best protection of wood fully exposed to weather; they can also be used on new or weathered wood, or wood previously finished with other penetrating finishes, without extensive surface preparation.

If a solid color is desired, latex opaque stains are preferable over oil-based opaque stains, since they are more flexible, have better color retention, and are less prone to mildew. However, extensive surface preparation is required for proper adhesion, and latex stains in general should not be used on structures exposed to direct sunlight.

Interior stains

Interior stains, used for furniture and woodwork, come in either pigmented or dye categories. Both can have an oil, synthetic, or water base. Pigmented stains color the wood with the same type of pigments used in paint. They range in color from almost clear to semi-transparent. They are easily applied with a brush or a rag, and are then wiped off to control the depth of the stain. An oil or polyurethane finish is often mixed with the stain, so the do-it-yourselfer can complete the staining and finishing job in one step. Some examples may include dark cherry or espresso finish.

Types Of Futon Frames

Futon Frame Styles

Futon Frame Stains & Finishes

Futon Frame Wood Types

Selecting The Right Mattress For Your Frame

Furniture And Your Health

Maintaining Your Futon

Comments | Posted in Futon Frames By Thetan A

Daybeds

Wednesday, February 8, 2017 11:46:30 AM America/Los_Angeles

What is a Daybed?

What is a Daybed?

 

You may have heard of a daybed, but what exactly is it?  At first glance, a daybed looks more like a couch rather than a bed. The daybed is in the same class as a sofa bed or futon, however it does not convert from couch to bed.

For Sofa beds, the back of the “couch” also serves as the headboard for the bed. It is different from a futon in that a futon does not have a headboard and is constructed differently. The back of the futon is actually the mattress, which folds to form the shape of a couch. In order to be used as a bed, the futon must be converted from a couch to a bed. The mattress of a day bed acts as both the couch and the mattress without having to be folded or converted.

Daybeds are usually manufactured from wood or metal and consist of two sides or arms and a back section (for sitting). Daybeds traditionally come in twin size, however, some are available with additional trundles that are stored underneath the bed and pop up to create a sleeping surface as large as a king sized bed. In many models, the trundle is on wheels in order to make it easier to pull out from beneath the bed. It can then be popped up in order to be at the same level as the main portion of the day bed. Some daybeds have a trundle portion that can be easily connected to the main portion in order to make a king size bed. Alternatively, the trundle can be left separate in order to create two twin size beds, which will come in handy in children’s rooms during sleepovers.

Some people may consider a day bed to be a more comfortable than a futon, but a daybed usually takes up more space than a futon and is a more permanent fixture in a room. In general, the day bed can be a more classical approach to serving this need, although less versatile than a sleeper sofa or a futon, as it is typically used in guest bedrooms or a home office which is doubling as a secondary bedroom rather than as a couch in the living room.

Types Of Futon Frames

Futon Frames

Modern Sofa Beds

Sofa Beds vs. Futon Frames
Selecting The Right Mattress For Your Frame
Futon Frame Styles
Outdoor Futon Covers
Outdoor Futon Cover Selection

Comments | Posted in Futon Frames By Thetan A

Futon Frame History

Wednesday, February 8, 2017 11:40:46 AM America/Los_Angeles

History of Futon Frames

History of Futon Frames

 

In both bedrooms and living rooms, a futon is an excellent alternative to a traditional bed or couch as they provide more space, are often less expensive, can be just as comfortable, and are typically more versatile. In spite of their benefits, some still decide against futons, believing they are only used by college students and people just starting out. This could not be farther from the truth. Futon Frames are not just for college dorm rooms anymore.

Futon Frames were never designed specifically for the college dorm room.The first futons in Japan were nothing like the ones you buy online or in furniture stores today. The original futon was a thin mattress – only about two to three inches thick – filled with long-staple cotton, which made the futon sturdier and more durable. It was easy to roll up and store during the day, until needed again at night. Their portability and easy storage made futons popular in Japan, and it wasn’t long before other cultures started to catch on and adopt their own versions of this furniture piece. The word “Futon” originally described a bedding system, rather than the bed itself, consisting of a base, (shikibuton), the futon mattress itself usually filled with cotton batting, a comforter (kakebuton) or blanket (moku), and a pillow (makura).

More recently in the United States, futons started to make an appearance in the early 70s, but instead of just being used to sleep, the American versions were also used for sitting and was raised up off of the floor. When first introduced in the U.S., the futon wasn’t too spectacular. It was, however, more affordable and convenient, which is why the furniture piece became popular among students and apartment renters. Improvements have been made over the years and futons have come a long way. Although cheaper, less comfortable options are still available, futons can now also be beautiful, comfortable and sturdy. Additionally, to this day they are often more affordable than an actual sofa or bed.

Comments | Posted in Futon Frames By Thetan A

Leather Sofabeds

Wednesday, February 8, 2017 11:36:30 AM America/Los_Angeles

Leather Sofa Beds

Leather Sofa Beds

 

Leather sofa beds are perfect for updating your living room, bedroom or dining room adding the feeling of luxury and quality. A nice leather sofa bed can add traditional charm or modern appeal to a foyer, living room, parlor, family room or sitting room, and leather headboards create a regal atmosphere in any bedroom. Lifestyle Solution's Kingsley Leather Sofa Bed Frame is a perfect example of this.

Leather is popular because it is breathable, providing ventilation, absorption and maintenance of humidity. Leather is also a temperature regulating material, retaining warmth in the cold and providing cooling through ventilation in the heat. It is a misconception that leather is cold. It takes only 12 seconds to warm up to body temperature. When looking to purchase leather furniture, you will need to consider style, size and color. More importantly, when shopping for quality and value in home furnishings it helps to know exactly what you are paying for. Shopping for leather furniture is even more difficult, as there different types or grades of leather are used to create furniture. Each has their own pro’s and con’s. To make matters more difficult, some manufacturers use the word ‘leather’ for products that contain little to no real leather. You want to be sure if you are purchasing leather furniture that you know exactly what type of leather you are getting. Not all leathers are created equal. Leather can undergo complex treatment processes in order to create numerous furniture products, hence the many different terms being thrown around. Each type of leather has its own characteristic look and feel, making them better suited for some uses and not others. Knowing the different types of leather and which will fit your lifestyle can help save time and money.

Types Of Futon Frames

Futon Frames

Modern Sofa Beds

Sofa Beds vs. Futon Frames
Selecting The Right Mattress For Your Frame
Futon Frame Styles
Outdoor Futon Covers
Outdoor Futon Cover Selection

Comments | Posted in Futon Frames By Thetan A
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SLEEP & HEALTH

The Futon Shop a family owned company since 1976 maintains a high level of Eco-Consciousness to strive for a healthier future for our planet and our country. We work tirelessly towards bringing the best organic cotton and eco-friendly futons, sofa beds & chemical free furniture options for the health and comfort of our customers